Workforce

+ Child Care

Two Vital Components of a Thriving San Diego Region

Child care and economic development are linked

Employees’ inability to secure child care has major effects for businesses and the economy

$57 Billion

The annual national cost of lost earnings, productivity, and revenue due to the child care crisis1

Most parents in San Diego have to work really hard to make ends meet

San Diego is the 13th most expensive metro area in the nation2

%

Percentage of San Diego families with children where all parents in the household are working3

%

The average price of child care for two young children in the San Diego region consumes 40% of the budget for a typical family of four5

We are losing parents from the workforce because they can’t find affordable child care or they’re settling for low quality care that isn’t good for the development of their children—our future workforce.

Women are disproportionately affected

94% of those involuntarily working part-time in the U.S. due to child care issues are women6

San Diego has the second lowest female participation in the labor force among major American cities7

Every year a woman spends out of the workforce equates to three years in lost income8

It is time for San Diego to act because…

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Child care supports the current workforce

Parents must have child care to work and quality child care lets parents work dependably with peace of mind

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High quality child care builds a strong future workforce

  • Great early experiences yield a lifetime of education, social and health benefits
  • More family income when children are young builds strong bodies and minds,9,10 and reduces harmful stress and trauma11

Let’s explore the workforce + child care connection